WHPP

(redirected from Wellhead Protection Program)
AcronymDefinition
WHPPWellhead Protection Program
WHPPWorker Health Protection Program
WHPPWorksite Health Promotion Program
WHPPWaste Handling and Packaging Plant
WHPPWildlife Habitat Protection Program (various locations)
WHPPWorkplace Hazard Prevention Program (Canadian Union of Postal Workers)
References in periodicals archive ?
That regional program is locally supported by the Safe Drinking Water Act's Wellhead Protection Program (now expanded to the Source Water Protection Program) whose areas of protection have slowly but surely been created for almost all of the public water supply well fields in Ohio (Smith 2004).
The Wellhead Protection Program first established under the Safe Drinking Water Act 1986 Amendments (US EPA 2004c) has now been replaced/expanded in the 1996 Amendments to the Safe Drinking Water Act by the Source Water Protection Program (US EPA 2004d).
While the Sole Source Aquifer program is relatively weak, the Wellhead Protection Program and the Source Water Protection Program have the ability to be incorporated into local zoning and planning efforts as overlay zoning districts.
Those two programs are the regionally applied Sole Source Aquifer systems (five areas in Ohio currently designated with two more applications under development) and the more localized Wellhead Protection Program (now Source Water Protection Program), which applies to the approximately 1350 public water supplies utilizing ground water in Ohio.
Miller and co-authors (2003) found that prior to organizing a countywide wellhead protection program it was important to conduct a comparative analysis, with a GIS, of the methods used for their delineation.
Washington state wellhead protection program guidance (Publication #331-018).
Isle Aire Beach Water Association Wellhead Protection Program.
In Whatcom County, Washington, it was determined that it was important to conduct a comparative analysis of methods used for the delineation of wellhead areas before organizing a wellhead protection program.
Most of the responsibility for the implementation of a wellhead protection program lies at the local level, as does land use planning.
For years, state agencies across the United States have been adopting wellhead protection programs.
As Miller (1992) writes, "A thorough knowledge of groundwater flow systems and an understanding of how contaminants migrate through geologic formation leads to (even more) successful wellhead protection programs.
The CFR method can he an effective first step for small water systems lacking the financial or personnel resources to establish more sophisticated wellhead protection programs.