WISE

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AcronymDefinition
WISEWide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer
WISEWomen in Science and Engineering
WISEWater Information System for Europe (EU)
WISEWeb Information Systems Engineering
WISEWorld Institute of Scientology Enterprises
WISEWomen's Ischemia Syndrome Evaluation (Epidemiology Data Center; University of Pittsburgh)
WISEWorld Information Service on Energy
WISEWinter Semester
WISEWilberforce Institute for the study of Slavery and Emancipation (UK)
WISEWireless Intelligent Sensor
WISEWorkflow Based Internet Services
WISEWindows Interface Source Environment
WISEWorldwide Information System Exchange
WISEWashington Internships for Students of Engineering
WISEWomen Into Science and Engineering
WISEWorld and Islam Studies Enterprise
WISEWorkshop on Information Systems and Economics
WISEWellness for Independent Seniors (Women's College Hospital; Canada)
WISEWeb-based Integrated Science Environment
WISEWorkers in the Sex Industry (CBO, Act, Australia)
WISEWindows Interface Source Environment (Microsoft)
WISEWireless System Engineering
WISEWing In Surface Effect
WISEWorkshop on Inspection in Software Engineering
WISEWireless Signal Extraction (transportation; real-time traffic information)
WISEWorld Infrastructure Security Environment
WISEWomen In Search of Equity
WISEWeb Intelligence Search Engine (US DoD)
WISEWomen in Spinal Cord Evolution (Frederick, MD)
WISEWorld Information Systems Exchange
WISEWorld Institute for Social Enlightenment (California)
WISEWeb Integrated Systems Engineering
WISEWalk-In Synthetic Environment
WISEWestern Investigation & Security Enterprises, Inc.
WISEWindows of Information for Student Education (North Carolina)
WISEWorkstation Interface Software Engineering (CDI)
WISEWorkplace Information Systems Enhancement
WISEWholesale Interservice Support Agreement
WISEWork Initiatives Leading to Sustainable Employment (UK)
WISEWrite Improved SOWs Easily (manual)
References in periodicals archive ?
The Collin College physics students analyzed satellite images from the new Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE).
In this mosaic from NASA's Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer, the stars of the constellations Cassiopeia and Cepheus are visible.
Originally called the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE), the spacecraft was launched in December 2009.
Led by Marc Kuchner (NASA Goddard) and the Zooniverse team, Disk Detective uses data from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) satellite, which found hundreds of thousands of infrared sources that could be disks around nearby stars --or far-off galaxies, interstellar dust clouds, or other extended infrared sources.
The person also wrote that researchers using their Near-Earth Object Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (NEOWISE), found that the 10-mile wide object was approximately 51 million miles from Earth.
In a new image highlighting the chance alignment, radio data from the VLA are blue and infrared observations from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope and Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) are yellow and orange, respectively.
Launched on December 14, the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer is poised to begin the most thorough survey yet of the infrared universe.
The space agency's asteroid unit, also known as the Near Earth Object Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer, or (http://https://www.
Observations from NASA's Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) rule out a gas giant in the outer solar system, but smaller objects are too faint for WISE to spot them.
Washington, May 24 ( ANI ): A team of astronomers using NASA's Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) to survey more than 170,000 supermassive black holes have now decided to re-examine a decades-old theory about the varying appearances of these interstellar objects.
NASA's Near-Earth Object Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (NEOWISE) spacecraft has spotted a never-before-seen asteroid -- its first such discovery since coming out of hibernation last year.
Their selective hunt for these specific quasars started with NASA's Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) spacecraft, which has hundreds of millions of objects in its all-sky, infrared survey of the Universe.