WMAP

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AcronymDefinition
WMAPWilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (NASA)
WMAPWestern Mining Action Project (Colorado)
WMAPWisconsin Medical Assistance Program
WMAPWeighted Map
WMAPWatershed Management Action Plan (Lower Putah Creek Watershed Portal; California)
WMAPWaste Minimization Award Program
References in periodicals archive ?
The simulation started about 23 million years after the Big Bang and the initial conditions were generated using the CAMB tools, provided by Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe website.
The Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) followed in 2001, and Planck in 2009.
Linder, working with Alireza Hojjati and Johan Samsing, who were then visiting scientists at Berkeley Lab, analyzed the latest satellite data from the European Space Agency's Planck mission and NASA's Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP), which pushed CMB measurements to higher resolution, lower noise, and more sky coverage than ever before.
In addition, the findings were combined with published data from NASA's Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe to obtain an independent measurement of dark energy, one of the greatest mysteries of our cosmos.
Later data from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP for short) brought those cosmic fluctuations into even greater focus.
First year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) observations: Determination of cosmological parameters.
Astronomers have debated the existence of these so-called Fermi bubbles since 2003, when Doug Finkbeiner (now at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics) discovered a fog of energetic particles in data from NASA's Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP).
By 2003, NASA's Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe and other experiments had studied those variations statistically and found that they fit a model in which the universe consisted of 5 percent ordinary matter, 24 percent mysterious dark matter whose gravity binds the galaxies, and 71 percent bizarre space-stretching dark energy.
When they compared their final results before the AAS meeting, both teams found somewhat less structure than would have been expected from other measurements such as the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP), but, says Berkeley Lab's Huff, "the results are not yet different enough from previous experiments to ring any alarm bells.
In the 2000s, a satellite called the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe mapped how that radiation is spread across the entire sky.
The optical design and characterization of the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe.
The Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) team has released its final results from WMAP's epochal 9-year mapping of the microwave background radiation.