WMFH

(redirected from Work made for hire)
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AcronymDefinition
WMFHWork Made for Hire
References in periodicals archive ?
a work specially ordered or commissioned for use as a contribution to a collective work, as a part of a motion picture or other audiovisual work, as a translation, as a supplementary work, as a compilation, as an instructional text, as a test, as answer material for a test, or as an atlas, if the parties expressly agree in a written instrument signed by them that the work shall be considered a work made for hire .
In Community for Creative Non-Violence v Reid, (26) the Supreme Court applied general common law of agency principles to determine whether the work was prepared by an employee, and therefore a work made for hire, or an independent contractor.
13) In the second category, works are found to be made for hire when they are specially ordered or commissioned for use as one or more of the several categories enumerated in [section] 101(2) (which can all be characterized as collective works) (14) and about which the parties have expressly agreed in writing that the work shall be considered a work made for hire.
Consequently, the client cannot claim that the copyright belongs to the client under the work made for hire provision of the copyright act.
56) Thus, although the sculpture looked to the court like a joint work, if the definition of a work made for hire had been satisfied, the court would have ignored the possibility of a joint work.
work made for hire, anonymous, pseudonymous)," said Aftab.
Thus, when firms hire independent contractors to develop or modify software, both parties must sign an agreement that the work shall be considered a work made for hire so the copyright belongs to the firm.
144) At the same time, Congress limited the right of parties to contract for work-made-for-hire status; a commissioned work can qualify as a work made for hire only if the parties so agree and the commissioned work falls into specified statutory categories.
The Candy Land case highlights one of the most common misconceptions about copyright law: that if you pay someone to develop copyrighted material for you, it is a work made for hire and you own it.
Copyright ownership and the Work Made for Hire Doctrine.
I]f her contribution was neither a work made for hire nor the requisite authorship to warrant a claim in a joint work, Ms.