WAHR

(redirected from Working at Height Regulations)
AcronymDefinition
WAHRWorking at Height Regulations (UK)
WAHRWeighted Average Hourly Rate (employee wage statistic)
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References in periodicals archive ?
Courses on offer include CIEH First Principles, IOSH/ NEBOSH Health and Safety, COSHH Essentials, Responding to Critical Situations and Emergencies, Control Room Operations, Confined Space Entry and Escape, Working at Height Regulations, Safe Lifting Operations, Mechanical Joint Integrity, Small Bore Tubing, Process Measurement and Instrumentation, Implementing 5S, Six Sigma, Lean Manufacturing Workshop, Manual Handling, CCNSG, RIDDOR Appreciation and Application, COMAH Site Evacuation Training, Lifting and Slinging, Lifting Gear Inspection, Safe Lifting Operations, Fork Lift Truck, Basic Mechanical Fitting, Electricity at Work Regulations, CAD and many more.
The firm's expansion plan follows its success in responding to the recent introduction of the Working at Height regulations, supplying a range of high access machinery that contractors are increasingly choosing to hire, rather than buy.
"We normally do a repair and painting programme on an annual basis but new working at height regulations now require us do these works from scaffolds whereas we used to do them from ladders," said Mr Cooney.
As farmers come to terms with another EU inspired set of regulations, the Working at Height Regulations, which, however well intentioned, will add to costs ( even working on the edge of a hole is now "working at height" ( there comes news of an imaginative attempt to square commercial reality with restrictive rules.
The width and height restrictions for scissor lifts set out in the Working at Height Regulations mean that, although it may be possible to take two people up to a given height indoors, it is safe for only one person to ascend to that height outdoors.
Additions to the hire fleet include a range of heating equipment, comprising the latest flame free blowers, specialist low-level access equipment, which conforms with working at height regulations, and six scissor lifts.
The HSE recommends, through the Working at Height Regulations 2005, that working at height should be avoided wherever possible.