XRT

(redirected from X-ray therapy)
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AcronymDefinition
XRTRadiation Therapy
XRTExtensions for Real Time Market Data
XRTX-Ray Telescope
XRTExchange Rate
XRTExternal Beam Radiation Therapy
XRTX-Ray Therapy (radiation)
XRTExtensions for Real-Time
XRTX-Ray Topography (mapping crystalline solids)
XRTExtended Reliability Test
References in periodicals archive ?
The county council of Sormland, Sweden has awarded contracts for X-ray therapy devices.
Surgical removal and/or a quick blast of X-ray therapy is all that's needed as treatment in most cases.
Given intravenously to a patient, texaphyrin boosts the effectiveness of X-ray therapy and makes small clusters of cancer cells easier to see on magnetic resonance images.
Martin Weinhous, chief medical physicist in the radiation oncology department at the Cleveland Clinic in Ohio, once used a software program developed by another medical physicist to set up patients for breast cancer X-ray therapy. In X-ray therapy for breast cancer, the affected tissue can be irradiated from three different directions, and to avoid overdosing or underdosing the patient, the doctor has to be sure that there are no gaps or overlaps of the X-ray beams.
Request for quotations : procurement of works (services) on metrological control: calibration, calibration, certification of gamma therapy and x-ray therapy devices for 2019
Hiroki Shirato, Director of Hokkaido University Hospital's Research Group with which Hitachi conducted the joint development, stated, "Hokkaido University has been developing motion tracking technology in the field of X-ray therapy. By combining this technology with Spot Scanning technology, the accurate irradiation of tumors, including those attached to large organs in motion which are difficult to irradiate with X-rays, will be possible and will lead to greater adaptation.
The X-ray therapy, conducted on a small number of rats whose spinal cords were partially or completely severed, has generated both interest and skepticism among scientists.