ALFT

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AcronymDefinition
ALFTAirlift
ALFTAbnormal Liver Function Test
ALFTAction-Level Fault Tolerance
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References in periodicals archive ?
In less than five months of operations, Airlift reports 50,000 riders in Lahore and has raised seed financing of over $2.2 million, according to Menabytes, a publication that covers technology and startups in the Middle East and Africa.
Q) Military Airlift and AAR has now moved for the first time to Lisbon - what opportunities does this provide you as chair to steer discussions with our southern European allied partners?
While Airlift serves a broad market, their main customers are educated middle-class Pakistanis who desire a convenient solution for their daily commute.
The post Injured crew member airlifted from ship off Limassol appeared first on Cyprus Mail .
Between December 1965 and June 1967, the Air Force faced a massive airlift backlog in Vietnam due to the escalating tension in South Vietnam and an increase in airlift demand around the world.
A statement by the board's Public Relations Officer, Yunusa Abdullahi, said the intending pilgrims were airlifted by one of the assigned carriers, Max Air.
Air Education and Training Command: 58th Airlift Squadron, Altus AFB, Oklahoma.
'This substantial increase in the actual flight time was largely brought about by the heavy airlift operations of the Wing such as troops deployment and reinforcements most particularly in the military campaign in Marawi; Armed Forces of the Philippines and PAF Logistic flights; humanitarian and disaster relief missions in the aftermath of typhoon Vinta; support to fighter aircraft operations or territorial defense operations; aero-medical evacuation sorties; maritime patrols in the West Philippine Sea and Benham Rise; support to national development efforts and socio-economic initiatives; frequent international flight missions most particularly in Guam and Arizona; VVIP/VIP flights including Presidential sorties and the recent holiday sorties,' the Air Force said.
Rather than flying designated routes requiring multi-day stopovers like the CRAF carriers, tactical airlift providers embed operations for extended periods of time--sometimes years--living and working alongside the military units they serve.
An airlift planning adage states "the Army does not have light units; it has heavy and incredibly heavy units." This adage will remain painfully relevant to the current global environment of burgeoning strategic complexity, insufficient budgets, continuous (and probably expanding) overseas commitments, a predominantly homeland-based force structure, and "diverse enemies employing traditional, unconventional, and hybrid strategies." (3) Enemies such as international criminal gangs, transnational terrorists, and insurgents are growing stronger.
Throughout the history of the mobility air forces, planners tried various initiatives to centralize control of both airlift types.