CELNAV

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AcronymDefinition
CELNAVCelestial Navigation
CELNAVCelestial Navigation Training
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References in periodicals archive ?
It will use newly developed celestial navigation technology for near-instantaneous precision azimuth solutions in favorable weather conditions.
The most commonly the satellite orbit dynamics equation is used with celestial navigation system of rectangular coordinate expression of perturbation motion equation and Newton equations of motion among them.
It's still in the toolkit of older military aviators, but various forms of area navigation (GPS, INS, etc.) have made it only slightly handier than celestial navigation.
government has published over fifty editions since acquiring the copyright to Bowditch: this drops dated material and offers new methods, technologies and techniques to keep up with the changing world of electronic and celestial navigation. It continues to be a 'must' reference for any serious maritime holding.
Celestial Navigation in the GPS Age, revised edition
Andy Papageorge, remarked that celestial navigation in a K-ship was were assigned to each crew navigators.
Although I struggled with the sextant and celestial navigation, as long as I stayed on the bridge and worked at it, the other ship officers would take the time to show me how to do it.
The foreword by HRH the Duke of York leads in to the opening chapters, which look at how navigation and navigational tools (including the development of the chronometer to allow determination of longitude at sea), celestial navigation, and surveying developed.
All of the airline's new A330s are being named after a star or constellation used by Polynesian voyagers for celestial navigation.
The company also has celestial navigation courses, in which sailors of all experience levels are introduced to the concept.
Assigned to the 27th Pursuit Squadron, he immediately sought opportunities to refine his aviation skills, mastering celestial navigation as well as instrument flying and becoming an instructor.
The commonest suggestion involves the concept that moths (and other insects) use a form of celestial navigation called transverse orientation in order to navigate at night, using the moon as a fixed beacon (Sottibandhu and Baker, 1979).