D

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AcronymDefinition
DDay
DDaily
D500 (Roman numeral)
DDigital
DDivision
DDepth
DDenver, Colorado (mint mark)
DBattery Size
DDemocrat
DDecimal
DCalciferol (vitamin)
DBelow Average grade
DDenarius/Penny (nail size)
DDate
DData
DDrive
DDisplay
DDistance
DDirector (Drone Control; US military aircraft designation; as in D-21)
DDead
DDrive (automatic transmissions)
DDegree
DDutch
DDaughter
DDeutschland (Germany) (International Auto Identification)
DDraw (a tie; sports)
DDallas, TX, USA
DDiscuss
DDevice
DDistance Vision
DDelta
DDiablo (roleplaying game)
DDefense
DDedicated (Channel)
DDiesel
DDrum
DDelay
DDublin (car registration identification)
DDiversity
DDuty Factor
DDepot
DDeparture
DPenny (old British penny)
DDiamonds (playing cards)
DDemonstration
DDuke (British title of nobility)
DDiameter
DDensity
DDragon (Yu-Gi-Oh!)
DDatum
DDesperados (game)
DDrain (transistor; electronics)
DDimensional
DDaytime (broadcasting operating schedule)
DDigit
DDoctrine
DDeed (real estate)
DDeaf (member of the Deaf Community who shares a sense of Deaf Culture)
DDrag Force (aerodynamic equations)
DDiarrhea
DDüsseldorf (Germany)
DDifferential
DDirecting
DDerivative
DDeceased
DDummy
DDetective (NSW, Australia)
DDetective (police)
dDeaf (person who can not hear but is not part of the Deaf Community)
DDependency
DDiners Club (credit card)
DDisconnect
DDoubtful (player's likelihood of participating)
DDinar
DDiode
DAbsorbed Dose
DDominion Resources Inc (stock symbol)
DDiffusion Coefficient
DTenacious D (band)
DDenominator
DTunisian Dinar (unit of currency)
DDorsal
DDielectric
DDefenseman (hockey)
DDeci- (metric prefix, 1/10)
DDiastolic (blood pressure)
DDecedent (IRB)
DDecrement
DAspartic Acid (amino acid)
DDeuterium
DDahlonega, Georgia (mint mark, 1838-61)
DDiopter (unit of optical power)
DDiamox (medicine)
DDiaphragmatic
DDelete(d) (action code)
DDenarius (Roman Coin)
DDebye (unit of dipole moment)
DDerated
DDegaussing
DDoubleword
DDie/Dice (role play reference)
DDextrorotary (clockwise optical rotaton)
dsurface drift (US DoD)
DDrift distance
DPneumatic Post (Scott Catalogue prefix; philately)
DDocumentary Division
DD Sub-Shell (third outer subshell of an electron shell)
DDistrict spare (Stores 100 code)
DFederal Reserve Bank of Cleveland, Ohio (designates original point of circulation of a dollar bill)
DCohen's Measure of Effect Size (statistics; usually expressed as italic d)
DDeutschverzeichnis (Works of Schubert by Otto Erich Deutsch)
Dtotal drift, data (US DoD)
DUndenominated United States Stamp (22 cents, introduced 17 Nov 1985)
DTotal Outside Dose (radiation)
References in periodicals archive ?
If a decedent dies possessing any incidents of ownership in a life insurance policy on his life, regardless of the identity of the beneficiary, the proceeds will be includable in the decedent's gross estate.
This deduction is allowed to the beneficiary of any IRD that caused an increase in the estate tax of the decedent.
36 million because the decedent was terminally ill when the gift was made.
The Parker court is the first Florida decision to hold that a personal representative is not an indispensable party to an action for the return of assets transferred by the decedent during his or her lifetime.
Plaintiffs' uncontroverted expert testimony that decedent was conscious and in pain for two to five seconds after being hit by the bus supports the jury's finding that decedent sustained conscious pain and suffering prior to her death.
If the decedent's adjusted basis in the property is less than the property's FMV on the decedent's date of death, the executor is allowed to allocate additional basis (basis increase) to certain assets that both are owned by the decedent at death and are acquired from the decedent.
In early 2010, the Decedent was diagnosed with mild dementia; he subsequently developed other health issues that ultimately resulted in his hospitalization and death.
Typically, the gross-up rule applies only to gift taxes paid by the decedent.
Figure P shows the median return on assets separately for single decedents and married decedents, by age of decedent and size of gross estate.
Of 28 decedents identified from hospital records, we found homes of 22 (79%); homes of 6 decedents could not be located or were too remote for inclusion.
The value, less encumbrances, of all property owned by the Decedent at the lime of death, excluding the homestead of and statutory allowances for the benefit of the widow or minor children, if any, of the Decedent, does not exceed $100,000.
This basis increase may be allocated by the executor to any property the that the executor chooses and may even be allocated to a portion of the property held by the decedent.