GCD

(redirected from general and complete disarmament)
Also found in: Dictionary.
Category filter:
AcronymDefinition
GCDGreatest Common Divisor
GCDGrand Central Dispatch (Apple technology)
GCDGriffith College Dublin (Dublin, Ireland)
GCDGreatest Common Denominator
GCDGame Compact Disc
GCDGroup Creative Director (various organizations)
GCDGrand Comic-Book Database
GCDgroundwater conservation district
GCDGlobal Cooldown (gaming)
GCDGestionnaire du Commerce de Détail (French: Retail Trade Manager; Switzerland)
GCDGrand Coulee Dam
GCDGeneral Commercial District (various locations)
GCDGulf Coast Division (Orange, TX)
GCDGas Chromatography Distillation
GCDGestion des Clients de la Douane (French: Management of Customs Clients; Switzerland)
GCDGlen Canyon Dam
GCDGeneral and Complete Disarmament
GCDGeneral Conformity Determination
GCDGold Coast Desalination (plant)
GCDGlobal Clinical Development
GCDGreater Confinement Disposal (waste management)
GCDGenome Cluster Database (sequence family analysis platform)
GCDGlobal Communication Devices
GCDGaia Community Discussion
GCDGuild of Catholic Doctors
GCDGlobal Clan Directory (gaming)
GCDGenetic Chromosome Dissection
GCDGlobal Connectivity Demonstration
GCDGoals of Care Designation
GCDGlass Cutting Device
GCDGeneral Defense Position/Plan
GCDGenerator Control Display
GCDGlobal Column Decoder (computer memory)
Copyright 1988-2018 AcronymFinder.com, All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
In 1982 Alva Myrdal, a Swedish WILPF member, and Alfonso Garcia Robles, Mexican ambassador to the Committee on Disarmament, shared the Nobel Peace Prize for their work on this treaty, and for their overall contribution at the United Nations for general and complete disarmament. While Myrdal's achievements were exceptional, many other WILPF members--including the late Kay Camp and the staff of Reaching Critical Will--have also contributed extensively to U.N.
* Reaffirmation that the ultimate objective in the disarmament process is general and complete disarmament under effective international control
government's "Program for General and Complete Disarmament in a Peaceful World," introduced at the 16th UN General Assembly and printed by the U.S.
According to Article 6 of the NPT, each of the Parties to the Treaty undertakes to pursue negotiations in good faith on effective measures relating to cessation of the nuclear arms race at an early date and to nuclear disarmament, and on the Treaty on general and complete disarmament under strict and effective international control.
disarmament proposals, particularly the State Department's 1961 Freedom From War blueprint for "general and complete disarmament" under UN supervision.
government's official policy for making the UN a "more highly developed organization." That policy, published by the State Department under the title Freedom From War: The United States Program for General and Complete Disarmament in a Peaceful World (1961), stated that disarmament "would proceed to a point where no state would have the military power to challenge the progressively strengthened U.N.
Pugwash Conferences in 1959 and 1960 played a significant role in shaping the Freedom From War blueprint for "general and complete disarmament" unveiled in a 1961 address to the United Nations by John F.
policy entitled Freedom From War: The United States Program For General and Complete Disarmament in a Peaceful World, also known as Department of State Publication 7277.
In Global Gun Grab, Grigg reveals the real intent behind the UN's call for "general and complete disarmament." That intent, he convincingly demonstrates, has much more to do with acquiring a monopoly of power than with eliminating all armaments.
General and complete disarmament under strict and effective international control shall permit States [nations] to have at their disposal only those non-nuclear forces, armaments, facilities and establishments as are agreed to be necessary to maintain internal order and protect the personal security of citizens and in order that States shall support and provide agreed manpower for a United Nations peace force.
Kennedy introduced a State Department-created document entitled Freedom From War: The United States Program for General and Complete Disarmament In a Peaceful World.
Kennedy, in a speech to the UN General Assembly, unveiled Freedom From War: The United States Program for General and Complete Disarmament in a Peaceful World.
Full browser ?