HRD

(redirected from heat-related death)
Also found in: Medical.
AcronymDefinition
HRDHuman Resource Development
HRDHood River Distillers (Hood River, OR)
HRDHuman Resources Department
HRDHurricane Research Division
HRDHypertension Renal Disease
HRDHypothetical Reference Decoder
HRDHonda Racing Development
HRDHidden Read Only Directory
HRDHigh Rate Detector
HRDHigh Resolution Diagnostic Diskette
HRDHuman Relations Department (various locations)
HRDhypothetical reference decoder (digital TV)
HRDHwa Rang Do (martial arts)
HRDHigh Rate Detector (Cassini mission)
HRDHuman Rights Defender
HRDHoge Raad Voor Diamant (Diamond High Council, Belgium)
HRDHuman Resources Directorate
HRDHuman Resource Division
HRDHertzsprung-Russell Diagram (astronomy)
HRDHazard Ratios of Death (survival analysis)
HRDHigh Rate Data
HRDHeat-Related Death (mortality)
HRDHigh Rate Dosimeter (US NASA)
HRDHannaford Bros. Co.
HRDHypoparathyroidism-Retardation-Dysmorphism Syndrome
HRDHonda Racing Development Ltd (UK)
HRDHigh Resolution Display
HRDHuman Rights Desk (Pakistan)
HRDHealth and Retirement Study
HRDHome Retention Division (finance industry)
HRDHigh Rate Demultiplexer
HRDHardware Requirements Document
HRDHigh-Rate Decorrelator
HRDHigh-Rate Dischargeability
HRDHardware Release Document (Ciena)
HRDHarm Reduction Development Program
HRDHawaii Renewable Development
HRDHigh Rate Pregnancy
HRDHorizontal Refractivity Depiction
References in periodicals archive ?
He said there was one other heat-related death in the 801,000 acre park this year but said fatalities are very rare for the area, which is about the size of Rhode Island.
The association of obesity with heat-related death in NYC is consistent with biologic evidence that adiposity increases vulnerability to heat exhaustion (4,5).
One heat-related death was reported at Dubai Hospital and another person had to be resuscitated at the Trauma Centre after heat exhaustion on July 8.
2003), we found that the proportion of deaths at home (rather than in a hospital or institution) was increased during heat waves relative to non-heat wave warm season days; at-home deaths could be a marker of social isolation, which has been associated with an increased risk of heat-related death. During the 1995 Chicago, Illinois, heat wave, social isolation was a major predictor of death (Semenza et al.
* A heat-related death was identified in CFOI as an exposure to environmental heat (BLS Occupational Injury and Illness Classification System [OIICS] event/exposure code 321), with the nature of injury attributed to effects of heat and light (OIICS nature code 072).
The association between cardiovascular disease and heat-related death is well established (7); this analysis suggests the need for additional investigations of the association between noncardiovascular conditions, such as endocrine and respiratory diseases, and the risk for heat-related death.
Family Sues TDCJ Over Heat-Related Death: "As summer temperatures rise, so do worries about conditions in state prisons.
To assess the health risk from hyperthermia, Arizona health practitioners and CDC researched cases of heat-related death and illness in Arizona, used U.S.
BACKGROUND: It has recently been postulated that low mortality levels in the previous winter may increase the proportion of vulnerable individuals in the pool of people at risk of heat-related death during the summer months.
For the 1995 and 1999 Chicago heat waves, the risk for heat-related death increased for persons with cardiac disease or psychiatric illness and for persons who lived alone.
A modest increase in risk of heat-related death was observed for those making less than versus more than $10,000 during the 1999 Chicago heat wave (Naughton et al.