IVN

(redirected from intravenous nutrition)
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Related to intravenous nutrition: intravenous feeding, total parenteral nutrition
AcronymDefinition
IVNin Vehicle Network
IVNIntravenous
IVNInteractive Video Network
IVNInternationale Vereniging voor Neerlandistiek
IVNIndustry Value Network
IVNInternational Video Network (San Ramon, CA)
IVNIntravenous Nutrition
IVNIntegrated Voice Network
IVNIntervening Networks
References in periodicals archive ?
The patients in the needling groups every seventh morning during the entire radiotherapy period answered the question: "Have you been capable of eating as much as you are used to?" using the answering alternatives: "Yes," "Yes, I have been eating more," "No, I have been eating less," "No, I have been eating much less," or "No, I have been eating much less; I needed intravenous nutrition." If the patients choose the last alternative, they also detailed the number of days with intravenous nutrition.
Macro-nutrition and enteral or intravenous nutrition showed statistical significance on CXR absorption rate.
Under the programme, long-term paediatric patients receiving intravenous nutrition at the hospital are transferred to their homes once their parents and caregivers are adequately trained and educated about how to use the specialised feeding equipment."
Conventionally nil per orally (NPO) and maintenance of patients with intravenous nutrition is a common practice after major gastro-intestinal (GI) surgery.
The babies were kept in incubators and received intravenous nutrition during the first few weeks after their birth, setting the daily cost of health care at Dh30,000.
Nagasaki et al., "Follow-up studies of children treated with a long-term intravenous nutrition (IVN) during the neonatal period," Journal of Pediatric Surgery, vol.
At the meeting, Olson also said similar problems threatened a wide variety of devices, ranging from compounders, which prepare intravenous drugs and intravenous nutrition, to picture archiving systems associated with diagnostic equipment, including massive $500,000 magnetic resonance imaging devices.
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