References in classic literature ?
Practically, the old have no very important advice to give the young, their own experience has been so partial, and their lives have been such miserable failures, for private reasons, as they must believe; and it may be that they have some faith left which belies that experience, and they are only less young than they were.
We might try our lives by a thousand simple tests; as, for instance, that the same sun which ripens my beans illumines at once a system of earths like ours.
It was immaterial whether he was born or not born, whether he lived or ceased to live. Life was insignificant and death without consequence.
"Well," remarked the woman, as she bustled around the room and set the table and brought food from the cupboard, "you were unlucky to live all alone in that dismal forest, which is much worse than the forest around here; but perhaps your luck will change, now you are away from it.
To live for myself avoiding those two evils is my whole philosophy now."
The callousness of these men, to whom industrial organization gave control of the lives of other men, was appalling.
Then the Interpreter placed on the ground before them the samples of lives; and there were many more lives than the souls present, and they were of all sorts.
I share with you this sense of oppressive narrowness; but it is necessary that we should feel it, if we care to understand how it acted on the lives of Tom and Maggie,--how it has acted on young natures in many generations, that in the onward tendency of human things have risen above the mental level of the generation before them, to which they have been nevertheless tied by the strongest fibres of their hearts.
" 'I have only a very little while to live, and I should like to see you, my friend, so that I may know what will become of my child-- whether henceforward he will be yours; and also to soften the regret that some day you might perhaps feel for my death.'
To live, and live abundantly, to sting with life, to be alive (which is to be what he is), it is good that man be life-blinded and sense-struck.
He said that one must not live for one's own wants, that is, that one must not live for what we understand, what we are attracted by, what we desire, but must live for something incomprehensible, for God, whom no one can understand nor even define.
"She will sleep upon a cot in the room next to ours," responded Ma'ame Pelagie, "and live as we do.