MAGPIE


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AcronymDefinition
MAGPIEMultipurpose Automated Genome Project Investigation Environment
MAGPIEMega Ampere Generator for Plasma Implosion Experiments (physics; Imperial College; UK)
References in classic literature ?
The magpie fluttered down into the court, swearing, and the Madman danced out, howling, with his fingers in his mouth.
The jackdaws were eating pie- crust, and the magpie was drinking gravy out of a patty-pan.
Pickwick and Sam descended the rickety staircase in safety, and issued forth in quest of the Magpie and Stump.
In their habits they well supply the place of our carrion-crows, magpies, and ravens; a tribe of birds widely distributed over the rest of the world, but entirely absent in South America.
Maud, the traitor, sat demurely at work, looking very like what Tom had called her, a magpie with mischief in its head.
I'm at low-water-mark myself--only one bob and a magpie; but, as far as it goes, I'll fork out and stump.
She had a wonderful way too, when listening to what was said to her, or when waiting for an answer to what she had said herself, of pausing with her head cunningly on one side, and one eye turned up like a magpie's.
It was full of cracks from top to bottom; and out of the openings magpies and rooks were flying; and the great bull-dogs, each of which looked as if he could swallow a man, jumped up, but they did not bark, for that was forbidden.
On the land were large flights of magpies and American robins; whole fleets of ducks and geese navigated the river, or flew off in long streaming files at the approach of the canoes; while the frequent establishments of the painstaking and quiet-loving beaver showed that the solitude of these waters was rarely disturbed, even by the all-pervading savage.
When you can look round a roomful of people and think that each one is a mere child in intellect compared with yourself you feel no more shy of them than you would of a select company of magpies or orang-outangs.
"Pie" in this case refers to magpies, the prey for the falcons.
The abode of Mrs Betty Higden was not easy to find, lying in such complicated back settlements of muddy Brentford that they left their equipage at the sign of the Three Magpies, and went in search of it on foot.