MOLDS


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Idioms, Encyclopedia.
AcronymDefinition
MOLDSModernization of Land Data Systems (geographical information system; institute)
MOLDSModem On Line Diagnostics (used by telcos to check data transmission speed of a telephone line)
References in periodicals archive ?
The two molds were sand blasted, and the coating was applied according to the optimal conditions.
The same two molds used for the aluminum pouring studies were then sand blasted and coated with a new application of boron nitride at optimal conditions for magnesium.
A lab machine will cost around $10,000 for the basic unit without molds.
A new approach to faster cycles focuses on resin modification rather than mold or machine technology.
The mold cases that have created this controversy are the ones that include enormous claims for health effects from the exposure to the mold.
Exposure to mold and the byproducts of mold is not an unusual condition in the human environment.
On the surface, handling indoor mold growth appears simple.
What is known is that molds can cause respiratory illnesses among workers exposed to moldy hay, straw or grain dust, and among office workers exposed to mold-contaminated humidifiers and ventilation systems.
The dramatic CDC study vaulted molds and their effects on human health into the public limelight.
Stachybotrys, along with penicillium and aspergillus, are the molds most often cited for wreaking havoc on home and health.
According to American School and University Magazine, more than one in five of the nation's public schools have reported problems with indoor air quality and more than half of those problems have been linked to mold and mildew.
Injection molds for automotive products, packaging, closures, pharmaceuticals, containers, electronics and toys.