MSTLY

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AcronymDefinition
MSTLYMostly
References in classic literature ?
"The thing that is mostly worrying your aunt Sally is the tempers that that man Jubiter gets your uncle into."
Anyway, it lays there a long time and gets rusty; and by and by somebody finds an old yellow paper that tells how to find the marks -- a paper that's got to be ciphered over about a week because it's mostly signs and hy'roglyphics."
(Rory was the horse that mostly went with me when a pair was ordered, and a good honest fellow he was.) We had our own driver, and as he was always considerate and gentle with us, we had a very pleasant day.
The business to which Silas was devoted was mostly his own--that, possibly, may have made a difference.
I got the express wagons and cabs mostly for $5; but the trucks and two-horse teams mostly raised me to $10.
They are mostly young, of stalwart frames; fellows who have felled forests, and now seek to drop the axe and snatch the whale-lance.
They mostly lie like the great knobbed blocks on a Gothic spire, forming solid courses of heavy masonry.
From a long and miserable experience of suffering, injustice, disgrace and aggression the nations of the earth are mostly swayed by fear - fear of the sort that a little cheap oratory turns easily to rage, hate, and violence.
It's mostly merchants who buy them, and rich tradesmen.
I wrote a diary, and I tried to give its record form and style, but mostly failed.
The side turned up to the public view, presented the spectacle of a gentleman, possessed of considerable reputation as a speaker at charitable meetings, and endowed with administrative abilities, which he placed at the disposal of various Benevolent Societies, mostly of the female sort.
In this ambition he achieved a remarkable and immediate success, by the publication of a little book entitled 'Euphues and His Anatomie of Wit.' 'Euphues' means 'the well-bred man,' and though there is a slight action, the work is mainly a series of moralizing disquisitions (mostly rearranged from Sir Thomas North's translation of 'The Dial of Princes' of the Spaniard Guevara) on love, religion, and conduct.