NECESSARY


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Related to NECESSARY: Necessary and sufficient
AcronymDefinition
NECESSARYNever Eat Cake, Eat Salad Sandwiches and Remain Young (spelling mnemonic)
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References in classic literature ?
(iv) Statements opposed as affirmation and negation belong manifestly to a class which is distinct, for in this case, and in this case only, it is necessary for the one opposite to be true and the other false.
Neither in the case of contraries, nor in the case of correlatives, nor in the case of 'positives' and 'privatives', is it necessary for one to be true and the other false.
Now if Socrates exists, it is not necessary that one should be true and the other false, for when he is not yet able to acquire the power of vision, both are false, as also if Socrates is altogether non-existent.
What is the ability to do a thing, but the power of employing the MEANS necessary to its execution?
It conducts us to this palpable truth, that a power to lay and collect taxes must be a power to pass all laws NECESSARY and PROPER for the execution of that power; and what does the unfortunate and culumniated provision in question do more than declare the same truth, to wit, that the national legislature, to whom the power of laying and collecting taxes had been previously given, might, in the execution of that power, pass all laws NECESSARY and PROPER to carry it into effect?
The Convention probably foresaw, what it has been a principal aim of these papers to inculcate, that the danger which most threatens our political welfare is that the State governments will finally sap the foundations of the Union; and might therefore think it necessary, in so cardinal a point, to leave nothing to construction.
Is the power of raising armies and equipping fleets necessary? This is involved in the foregoing power.
But was it necessary to give an INDEFINITE POWER of raising TROOPS, as well as providing fleets; and of maintaining both in PEACE, as well as in WAR?
With what color of propriety could the force necessary for defense be limited by those who cannot limit the force of offense?
It is worse than in vain; because it plants in the Constitution itself necessary usurpations of power, every precedent of which is a germ of unnecessary and multiplied repetitions.
A standing force, therefore, is a dangerous, at the same time that it may be a necessary, provision.
A dangerous establishment can never be necessary or plausible, so long as they continue a united people.