NFAI

(redirected from no-fault auto insurance)
AcronymDefinition
NFAINational Film Archive of India
NFAINational Folklore Archives Initiative (American Folklore Society)
NFAINorsk forening for allergologi og immunpatologi (Norway)
NFAINational Film Archive of Iran
NFAIno-fault auto insurance
NFAINorthwest Federation of American Indians
NFAINew Flyer of America Inc.
NFAINew-Fangled Artificial Intelligence
NFAINebraska Fertilizer & Ag-Chemical Institute
NFAINorthstar Financial Advisors, Inc.
NFAINational Food Animal Identification
NFAINational Fine Arts Institute (Mexico)
NFAINet Fixed Asset Investment
NFAInoeud fibreux antéro-interne
NFAINerve Fiber Analyzer I
References in periodicals archive ?
The Situation: Florida's no-fault auto insurance system remains rife with problems despite reform efforts.
State lawmakers' decision this year to replace no-fault auto insurance, also called personal injury protection (PIP), with a "tort" system, transformed the Colorado auto insurance scene.
Department of Transportation, 1985, Compensating Auto Accident Victims: A Follow-up Report on No-Fault Auto Insurance Experience.
On the other side of the issue, the Fair Action in Insurance Reform (FAIR) committee says innocent accident victims are suffering under the current no-fault auto insurance scheme, while the insurance sector is reaping record profits.
Other research discussed during conference sessions also related to cycles, solvency and regulation, as well as risk classification, health care and coverage, international insurance, no-fault auto insurance, workplace accident rates, insurer profitability and economic insurance and risk management theory.
The US Department of Transportation allows states to permit limited testing of autonomous vehicles, but not the sale of these vehicles, and a 2014 study by the RAND Corporation includes a discussion on the liability options; suggesting that the concept behind no-fault auto insurance laws might become an attractive alternative to tort-based laws as the use of automated vehicles becomes more widespread.
But there are many important differences among the states in the regulations that now exist within each category, see report on No-Fault Auto Insurance.
Lawsky continued the Cuomo administration's aggressive program to end no-fault auto insurance fraud and made news by announcing regulatory reforms that close loopholes that allow lawbreakers to exploit the system.
But there is no such decorum in Florida when it comes to pending no-fault auto insurance reforms.
The state's no-fault auto insurance law requires $10,000 of personal injury protection (PIP) coverage, and that's a pocket being picked by criminals, shady medical clinics, and certain lawyers willing to sue over a scratched fender.
If they succeed, other injury victims will be next: Federal no-fault auto insurance legislation, for example, will rear its head yet again.