NUCLEAR


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AcronymDefinition
NUCLEARNow Use Caution, Loose Electrons Are Reacting (Vault9 Forums)
References in periodicals archive ?
The statement was widely welcomed world-over as it reflected China's firm resolve against nuclear terrorism and its consistent efforts using nuclear technology for promoting peace and development across the board.
Today, the Cold War is over, the Soviet Union is no more, and the United States and Russia are dismantling their nuclear stockpiles.
The 1968 Nuclear Nonproliferation ("not multiplying") Treaty limited the nuclear club to five countries: the U.
Experts say the explosion was small for a nuclear blast, which might indicate that it was only partially successful.
The challenges of expanding nuclear energy are being addressed with the formation of the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership, an 11-nation consortium charged with developing global standards for design, construction and maintenance of nuclear facilities with the goal of reducing development costs while improving safety.
The federal government's 1950s advice to ``duck and cover'' in a nuclear attack may seem laughably inadequate in the face of a nuclear bomb capable of splintering buildings, and pop culture parodies of ``duck and cover'' abound.
The parallels between Brazil's nuclear ambitions and Iran's are numerous and i striking.
Last summer, a congressionally-mandated report produced by a blue-ribbon task force of experts found that reducing the number of sites we operate would save money, improve security, and make the complex better able to produce the next generation of nuclear weapons the United States may someday need.
News item, two decades from now: Never, since the Cuban missile crisis over sixty years ago, has the world come closer to nuclear catastrophe than at the beginning of 2025.
Worldwide there are now 440 nuclear power reactors operating in 31 countries and producing a combined capacity of 367 gigawatts electric, or about 16% of the world's supply of electricity.
The bunker buster, or Robust Nuclear Earth Penetrator (RNEP)--and other new weapons like 5-kiloton, "usable" mini-nukes--keep showing up on Pentagon budget proposals like unappealing chef's specials.
However, since "the treaty was signed in 1968, there has been an ongoing struggle between the nuclear haves and the have-nots," Archbishop Migliore observed.