PHIL

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Related to philosophy: Philosophy of Life
AcronymDefinition
PHILPhilosophy
PHILPhilippine
PHILPhilippians
PHILPublic Health Image Library (US CDC)
PHILPhiladelphia, PA, USA
PHILPediatric Health Information Line (Southeast Child Safety Institute; Alabama)
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References in classic literature ?
It was believed also that from writers mainly British and American fuller consideration of English Philosophy than it had hitherto received might be looked for.
The need which Professor Muirhead stressed is no less pressing to-day, and few will deny that philosophy has much to do with enabling us to meet it, although no one, least of all Muirhead himself, would regard that as the sole, or even the main, object of philosophy.
And yet, if there are no universal ideas, what becomes of philosophy? (Parmenides.) In the Sophist the theory of ideas is spoken of as a doctrine held not by Plato, but by another sect of philosophers, called 'the Friends of Ideas,' probably the Megarians, who were very distinct from him, if not opposed to him (Sophist).
They pass from the subject to the object, from earth (diesseits) to heaven (jenseits) without regard to the gulf which later theology and philosophy have made between them.
In English philosophy too, many affinities may be traced, not only in the works of the Cambridge Platonists, but in great original writers like Berkeley or Coleridge, to Plato and his ideas.
Besides, I had a contempt for the uses of modern natural philosophy. It was very different when the masters of the science sought immortality and power; such views, although futile, were grand; but now the scene was changed.
Chemistry is that branch of natural philosophy in which the greatest improvements have been and may be made; it is on that account that I have made it my peculiar study; but at the same time, I have not neglected the other branches of science.
"He too has a philosophy of his own at the service of his natural tendencies," he thought.
"Come, you'd better let philosophy alone," he said.
True to his ruling passion, philosophy had claimed him to the last, a set of Schopenhauer's works receiving his attention when able to study; but this was varied with readings in the 'Mermaid Series' of old plays, in which he took much pleasure.
He did not, however, take warning from 'Mardi,' but allowed himself to plunge more deeply into the sea of philosophy and fantasy.
An important aspect of Nietzsche's philosophy is brought to light in this discourse.