PUN


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AcronymDefinition
PUNPunjabi (language)
PUNPhysical Unit Number
PUNNational Unity Party (Central African Republic)
PUNPresses Universitaires de Namur (French, Belgium)
PUNPlasma Urea Nitrogen
PUNPatients United Now (Washington, DC)
PUNPrezzo Unico Nazionale (Italian: Single National Price; energy market)
PUNPôle Universitaire Normand (French)
PUNPunia, Zaire (airport code)
PUNPeople United for Nothing
PUNProject Update Notice
References in classic literature ?
I myself am Thoroughly Educated, and I say that puns display genius.
No doubt the assembled stomachs were impatient; for on the appearance of the register of mortgages--who had no defect except that of having married for her money an intolerable old woman, and of perpetrating endless puns, at which he was the first to laugh--the gentle murmur by which such late-comers are welcomed arose.
The Church and the nobility descended thus into the arena of puns, without, however, losing their dignity.
Bass will definitely think twice before using a cricket pun again!
Nepal has put its stance for further discussion observing the progress on the construction of Arun III,aACA[yen] Minister Pun was quoted by the agency as saying.
A smiling Robredo paid her courtesy call on Pun on the sidelines of this year's Asia Pacific Summit.
Minister for Energy, Water Resources and Irrigation Barsha Man Pun laid the foundation stone for the construction of 25MW solar plant on Friday.
Evaluating a pun's appropriateness and ascertaining audience expectations go hand-in-hand, and tutors must tread cautiously when discussing pun use in academic writing.
Fay Weldon had been on the pun production line before she wrote her first novel.
Last year we had musical entertainment from the Pun Loving Criminals, and this year the competitors have to guess which pun act they are performing - like Elaine Paige Against The Machine.
My crib was around the corner from Big Pun, and there was this dude from around my way that ran with him.
In critical literature the names most commonly employed to describe Shakespeare's witty experimenting with words include "wordplay" and "pun" (see, for instance, such leading researchers in the field as Muir [1950], Mahood [1968], Spevack [1953, 1969] or Delabastita [1993] for their personal preferences).