Rés

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Related to resistance: voltage, electrical resistance, resistor
AcronymDefinition
RésRésidence (French)
References in classic literature ?
The obstacles to usurpation and the facilities of resistance increase with the increased extent of the state, provided the citizens understand their rights and are disposed to defend them.
When the high cannot bring up the low to itself, it benumbs it, as man charms down the resistance of the lower animals.
It was one of those rigid principles, and no petty egoistic feeling, which had been the ground of Nancy's difficult resistance to her husband's wish.
The French, although they had gone through the ceremony of hoisting their colours for a few hours at all the principal places of the group, had not as yet visited the bay of Typee, anticipating a fierce resistance on the part of the savages there, which for the present at least they wished to avoid.
The work of excavation was not difficult: the earth with which the grave had been loosely filled a few hours before offered little resistance and was soon thrown out.
She had always additional strength of resistance when Philip was present, just as we can restrain our speech better in a spot that we feel to be hallowed.
He was told that his predecessors had been hindered from discovering it by the demon that guarded it, but that the demon was now at a great distance from his charge, and was grown blind and lame; that having lost his son, and being without any children except a daughter that was ugly and unhealthy, he was under great affliction, and entirely neglected the care of his treasure; that if he should come, they could call one of their ancient brothers to their assistance, who, being a man of a most holy life, would be able to prevent his making any resistance.
Those who are best acquainted with the last successful resistance of this country against the British arms, will be most inclined to deny the possibility of it.
Men are called healthy in virtue of the inborn capacity of easy resistance to those unhealthy influences that may ordinarily arise; unhealthy, in virtue of the lack of this capacity.
No, sir, with the exception of two or three friends every one deserted him; he had no means of resistance.
No, my friends," replied Aramis, solemnly; "no, my friends; no resistance.
Resistance was useless, and calling for help would have been sheer insanity.