SL

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SLSport Und Leicht (German, Mercedes-Benz SL)
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SLSegment Library
SLSymmetric Superlattice
SLSaha-Langmuir (equation)
SLStrategic Locator (missing children)
SLSalem Technical Services
SLSpontaneous Laughing
SLSniper Lobby (gaming)
References in periodicals archive ?
In the current setup, creating sonoluminescence takes far more energy than the bubble collapse gives off, even if fusion is taking place, Taleyarkhan says.
Saltmarsh, to monitor the sonoluminescence setup using different detectors.
Researchers have previously observed sonoluminescence outside the lab only in certain water pumps and in liposuction surgery using bubbles acoustically made, notes Seth J.
Preliminary results indicate that a sufficiently strong magnetic field can suppress sonoluminescence, Kang says.
Thus the Rayleigh-Taylor instability takes its quick and deadly effect at pressures too low to create sonoluminescence.
Scientists have known about sonoluminescence since 1934, when two German physicists aimed sound waves at water and created clouds of bubbles that gave off light.
In sonoluminescence, the collapse may send the bubble wall crashing in on itself at supersonic speeds, touching off shock waves that converge and then explode outward.
Unlike cold fusion, using sonoluminescence to make neutrons "is well-understood physics," says William Moss of Livermore national lab, a physicist who models the effects of nuclear bomb explosions.
However, Ritva Lofstedt and others in Putterman's group recently discovered a new kind of single-bubble sonoluminescence.
Single-bubble sonoluminescence might yield practical applications.
From such spectra, Suslick has deduced that sonoluminescence occurs at 5,000 kelvins, close to the temperature at the sun's surface.
Suslick's investigation of sonoluminescence complements other research he and his colleagues are doing on the effect of ultrasound on catalysis and the rates of chemical reactions (SN: 6/20/87, p.