STR8

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Related to straight: straight poker, Straight Talk
AcronymDefinition
STR8Straight
References in classic literature ?
"You Pellucidarians are endowed with a wonderful instinct," I reminded him, "an instinct that points the way straight to your homes, no matter in what strange land you may find yourself.
THEN he tried to find his way straight across the garden, but he became more and more puzzled.
But I never forgot." Her voice sank lower, and she looked straight before her.
I can say now neither what determined nor what guided me, but I went straight along the lobby, holding my candle high, till I came within sight of the tall window that presided over the great turn of the staircase.
He swore by all that was holy that he steered straight for the light when his boat struck, and that as he swam for shore, five minutes later, he saw the light reappear in another place.
Genevieve had noticed, with a slight touch of amusement, the curious way in which Joe snuggled his body in against Ponta's in the clinches; but she had not realized why, until, in one such clinch, before the snuggling in could be effected, Ponta's fist whipped straight up in the air from under, and missed Joe's chin by a hair's-breadth.
He went straight from the cowhouse to the counting house, and after a little conversation with the bailiff and Semyon the contractor, he went back to the house and straight upstairs to the drawing room.
"She's as straight as a poplar," said old Mazey, considering Magdalen's figure in drowsy soliloquy.
Nothing was visible, nor could be visible, to us, except Straight Lines; and the necessity of this I will speedily demonstrate.
We rode half through the city and through the famous "street which is called Straight" without seeing any thing, hardly.
The straight road was nearer but little used and had no stakes, or only poor ones covered with snow.
A sentinel at each end of the bridge stood with his rifle in the position known as "support," that is to say, vertical in front of the left shoulder, the hammer resting on the forearm thrown straight across the chest -- a formal and unnatural position, enforcing an erect carriage of the body.