SUMAC


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Related to SUMAC: staghorn sumac, poison sumac
AcronymDefinition
SUMACSheffield University Metals Advisory Centre (UK)
SUMACStevens Underground Music Awareness Committee (Stevens Institute of Technology; Hoboken, NJ)
SUMACStanford University Math Camp
References in periodicals archive ?
Lyophilized hydroalcoholic crude extract of sumac leaves reduced inflammation, chondrodegeneration, and oxidative stress.
Remove from the heat and add the fried garlic and sumac to it, stirring to mix it well.
Antimicrobial activities of Iranian sumac and avishan-e shirazi (Zatariamultiflora) against some food-borne bacteria.
Initially, we removed the necrotic tissues and pieces of sumac and onion from the wound, and then repaired the avulsed penile skin.
Over the years Ivy-Dry has continued to explore new ways to increase the effectiveness of treatments for poison ivy, poison sumac, bug bites and other skin irritations.
Hoy, los chullos de las tejedoras de Sumac Chaska vienen con disenos de moda, hilados mas finos y tenidos ecologicos.
"Since poison ivy, poison oak and poison sumac are present in many parts of the country year-round, our product is always available," says Zanfel president Jim Phillips.
Most contact allergens are weak requiring repeated exposures to establish an immune response, but poison ivy, oak, or sumac are strong antigens requiring only two exposures to establish sensitization in susceptible people (Weston & Bruckner, 2000).
The marsh is also home to several freshwater ponds, as well as staghorn sumac and black cherry trees, providing and important source of food for a wide variety of birds and mammals.
The Napa Valley-based Meritage Association has accepted its first member from outside the United States, Sumac Ridge Estate Winery of Summerland, B.C.
Poison sumac: A shrub or small tree, even more irritating than the other two but far less common and usually found only in swamps.
Poison sumac has much thinner leaves and grows into a tall shrub--but only in wet, swampy areas.