TRAIN


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AcronymDefinition
TRAINTrainingFinder Real-Time Affiliate Integrated Network (Public Health Foundation)
TRAINTourist Railway Association, Inc.
TRAINTraining Records and Information Network
TRAINTeleRail Automated Information Network
TRAINTokyo Regional Academic Inter-Network (Japan)
TRAINTransportation Assessment and Integration
References in classic literature ?
It looks like the young man who missed the boat train," he remarked.
During the night the train left the mountains behind, and passed Nassik, and the next day proceeded over the flat, well-cultivated country of the Khandeish, with its straggling villages, above which rose the minarets of the pagodas.
The approach of the train was more and more evident by the preparatory bustle in the station, the rush of porters, the movement of policemen and attendants, and people meeting the train.
They had to stop over several hours at Waymore Junction to catch the Black Hawk train.
Well, you get along for a bit, but soon find yourself in a long train of carts and carriages all obliged to go at a walk; perhaps you come to a regular block-up, and have to stand still for minutes together, till something clears out into a side street, or the policeman interferes; you have to be ready for any chance -- to dash forward if there be an opening, and be quick as a rat-dog to see if there be room and if there be time, lest you get your own wheels locked or smashed, or the shaft of some other vehicle run into your chest or shoulder.
There are three railway-tracks; the central one is cogged; the "lantern wheel" of the engine grips its way along these cogs, and pulls the train up the hill or retards its motion on the down trip.
There is yet a chance to stop it," I said, "if nothing happens to the train and I can get there in time.
I am going to town by this train, Gertrude," he said quickly.
When the train came into the station George felt relieved.
This in itself would hardly have stopped even a lingering train.
The little girl stood still to watch until the train had disappeared around a curve; then she turned to see where she was.
Much of what I have said has been written on board trains, or at hotels or railroad stations while I have been waiting for trains, or during the moments that I could spare from my work while at Tuskegee.