Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
TREATTherapeutics Research Education and AIDS Training in Asia (Foundation for AIDS Research)
TREATTrouble Report Evaluation and Analysis Tool
TREATTrees for the Evelyn and Atherton Tablelands (Australia)
TREATTransient Reactor Test
TREATTrust for Research and Education on the Arms Trade (est. 1990; UK)
TREATTransient Radar Test Facility
References in classic literature ?
Don't stop to quirk your little finger and simper over your plate, Amy," cried Jo, choking on her tea and dropping her bread, butter side down, on the carpet in her haste to get at the treat.
Shelby, naturally thinks well of his own ways; and I think I treat niggers just about as well as it's ever worth while to treat 'em.
This may seem to be harsh and stubborn and unconcilliatory; but it is to treat with the utmost kindness and consideration the only spirit that can appreciate or deserves it.
The thing is for you to treat him KIND, and not be saying things to make him remember he ain't in his own country and amongst his own folks.
My mistress was, as I have said, a kind and tender- hearted woman; and in the simplicity of her soul she commenced, when I first went to live with her, to treat me as she supposed one human being ought to treat another.
They are friends of my uncle's, whom he has lost sight of latterly -- the Tyrrels of Portland Place -- and they treat Miss Vanstone with as much kindness and consideration as if she was a member of the family.
It was accordingly the Prince's intention, which he for some time maintained, to treat these unwonted guests with a courtesy to which they had been little accustomed.
I cannot treat you in any other way," said the genius, "and if you would know why, listen to my story.
We were willing to be assured of a good reception in this port; the patriarch therefore sent me to treat with them.
The history informs us, then, that before they reached the country house or castle, the duke went on in advance and instructed all his servants how they were to treat Don Quixote; and so the instant he came up to the castle gates with the duchess, two lackeys or equerries, clad in what they call morning gowns of fine crimson satin reaching to their feet, hastened out, and catching Don Quixote in their arms before he saw or heard them, said to him, "Your highness should go and take my lady the duchess off her horse.
And we mean to treat you all," added Lydia, "but you must lend us the money, for we have just spent ours at the shop out there.
They kept their word: day after day their visits were repeated; they became "hail fellow well met" with Captain Bonneville's men; treat after treat succeeded, until both parties got most potently convinced, or rather confounded, by liquor.